Who in the World Invented Track Changes?

Fuller article here: Huffington Post

Is anyone in their right mind able to really work with all the action behind track changes in a document? What’s with all the lines and colors and highlighted material?

I know it’s useful but how can it be good if the whole experience of working with Track Changes in a document is like a circus on the page, more like a prison of words walking on a high wire with a light show underneath, arrows and dotted lines stabbing about the page.

I’m rebelling against it. What happened to just using the delete feature, and the keyboard for new data entry?

I’m back to the whole idea that simplicity is best. Flash fiction over grand lengthy works. Haiku rather than epic poems.

Six word memoirs instead of the whole self-focused 400 pages of me-me-me. But, I’m working on one of those, so I better get busy.

I’d love to see votes – email me or comment here: which do you prefer? Grand ambitious pages or a few select simple words (where there’s not need for Track Changes)?

3 thoughts on “Who in the World Invented Track Changes?

  1. Laura Matthews

    Hiya, I couldn’t survive without track changes.

    You do know you can turn off the visual, thought, right? So the changes are being tracked, but you don’t see them on screen? If you want more info on that, feel free to shoot me an email.
    :)
    Laura

    Reply
  2. muttslikeme Post author

    Hiya Laura, I do turn it off but something bugs me about what’s happening behind the scenes on the doc. Weird, huh?

    I’m being a little facetious about it all, and also have to live with it since that’s my world — getting material to agent, mag editors, etc., but it drives me nuts.

    If I need more on how to make it work, I will email. Thanks for the offer!
    ~Deborah

    Reply

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